You are here » About PAG»Library»Transportation Planning Library

Transportation Planning Library

  1. 2030 Regional Transportation Plan
  2. 2016-2020 Transportation Improvement Program (Current)
  3. 2015-2019 Transportation Improvement Program
  4. 2014-2018 Transportation Improvement Program
  5. 2013-2017 Transportation Improvement Program
  6. 2012-2016 Transportation Improvement Program
  7. 2011-2015 Transportation Improvement Program
  8. 2010-2014 Transportation Improvement Program
  9. 2009-2013 Transportation Improvement Program
  10. 2008-2012 Transportation Improvement Program
  11. 2007-2011 Transportation Improvement Program
  12. 2006-2010 Transportation Improvement Program
  13. 2005-2009 Transportation Improvement Program
  14. 2004-2008 Transportation Improvement Program
  15. 2003-2007 Transportation Improvement Program
  16. 2002-2006 Transportation Improvement Program
  17. 2001-2005 Transportation Improvement Program
  18. 2000-2004 Transportation Improvement Program
  19. 1999-2003 Transportation Improvement Program
  20. May 2009 Presentation on Bicycle Crash Analysis from 2001-2008
  21. Tucson-Pima Eastern Region 2008 Application Submitted to the League of American Bicyclists
  22. Historical Transportation Documents
  23. 1951 Street Arterial Plan for Tucson

2030 Regional Transportation Plan

NOTE: This plan has been updated, and can be found here 2040 Regional Transportation Plan.
 
The 2030 Regional Transportation Plan, known as the 2030 RTP, is a long-range vision of transportation needs in the Pima County region and was adopted by the Pima Association of Governments’ Regional Council on June 29, 2005. The plan addresses challenges created by existing needs and future growth.
 
The 2030 RTP is a planning document but it does not commit finances for specific projects.
 
2030 Plan Development
A task force comprised of representatives from each of PAG’s member jurisdictions, as well as public representatives from the region, was convened on April 2, 2001, to provide oversight and guidance to the development of the 2030 RTP. Key participants included neighborhood associations, business and environmental communities, senior citizen groups, public safety agencies, aviation and freight interests as well as interested citizens.
 
2030 RTP Components
The 2030 RTP includes regional transportation studies, programs, construction projects and other activities such as transit operations.

  • Studies help to develop new programs or provide greater detail about future construction projects.
  • Programs are usually activities that are ongoing and provide services or information, collect critical planning data, or fund operational costs for transportation systems.
  • Construction projects are the most familiar type of project activity and include building new facilities and repairing, replacing or retrofitting existing infrastructure.

Some of the ideas for projects were identified to be beyond the priorities within the 2030 timeframe and others were determined to be beyond available or potential funding sources.
Specific projects will be selected from the plan for implementation by appropriate PAG member jurisdictions using various funding sources. Funding is frequently determined in the PAG regional five-year Transportation Improvement Program.

The 2030 RTP is the region's prior long-range transportation plan. It has been replaced by the 2040 RTP adopted by the PAG Regional Council on July 1, 2010.

2030 RTP Documents

Informational Fact Sheets and Newsletters

Transit Element of the 2030 RTP

  • Phase I: Inventory and Analysis of Transit Services and Facilities ( 740Kb PDF ) was completed in April 2003. This technical memorandum provides an inventory of existing transit services and facilities in the Tucson region. It identifies major features and recent trends relating to transit service development while providing a context for potential recommendations.
  • Phase II: Identifying Future Transit Growth Markets ( 4,828Kb PDF ) was completed in June 2003. This technical memorandum identifies areas in the region that exhibit potential for transit service growth. These areas include major corridors that are expected to experience significant transit demand over the next 25 years.
  • Phase III: Recommended Transit Service and Facility Improvements ( 3,123Kb PDF ) was completed in September 2003. This technical memorandum identifies recommended transit improvements, services, facilities, and supporting actions that will meet mobility needs of the region. Recommendations are provided within the framework of three potential alternatives.

Top of Page

2015- 2019 Transportation Improvement Program 

Top of Page

2014- 2018 Transportation Improvement Program 

Top of Page

 2013- 2017 Transportation Improvement Program 

Top of Page

 2012- 2016 Transportation Improvement Program 

Top of Page

 2011- 2015 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2010 - 2014 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

 2009 - 2013 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2008 - 2012 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2007 - 2011 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2006 - 2010 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2005-2009 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2004 - 2008 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2003 - 2007 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2002 - 2006 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

2001- 2005 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

 2000 - 2004 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

1999 - 2003 Transportation Improvement Program

Top of Page

May 2009 Presentation on Bicycle Crash Analysis from 2001-2008

Top of Page

Tucson-Pima Eastern Region 2008 Application Submitted to the League of American Bicyclists

Top of Page

Historical Transportation Documents

Top of Page

1951 Street Arterial Plan for Tucson

In planning for the future, looking to the past can be enlightening. In 1950, the Tucson region’s population was about 78,000, downtown Tucson was the region’s vibrant commercial center and the interstate system was still in the early planning stage. The 1951 Street Arterial Plan for Tucson recommended a set of street improvements to address the region’s existing and future traffic problems.

The plan recommended making Broadway and Congress one-way through the downtown (an action finally implemented in 2007). The plan also recommended widening most of the major arterials in central Tucson. West of Alvernon, for example, Broadway, Speedway, Campbell and Country Club were to be widened to six through lanes, plus parking lanes and a 16-foot median. 

The total cost for all of the 1951 plan improvements was then estimated at $23 million. However, many of the key arterial improvements in the 1951 plan were not implemented or were only partially implemented. Unfortunately, the need for these improvements still exists today, only the problems are worse and the costs are much higher. For example, the cost of widening Grant Road to six lanes from Oracle to Swan is expected to be more than $160 million.

Top of Page

 

 

 

©Pima Association of Governments | 1 E Broadway Blvd, Suite 401, Tucson, AZ 85701 | Telephone (520) 792-1093, FAX (520) 620-6981